Single glazing – Energy Inefficient, Outdated and Costly

Single glazing describes a window with just a single pane of glass. Though most people may not realize it, single glazing rare today and a minimum of two panes has been standard for some time. In fact, triple glazing is already common today, particularly in Europe. Single glazing can still be found in historic buildings and old houses in need of renovation. In fact, due to their terrible energy efficiency and wastefulness, they are not allowed in new construction in the European Union.

Renovate & Replace Single Pane Windows

By switching to double or triple glazing from single, homeowners will experience a noticeable and consistent drop in their monthly energy costs. If you've had single glazing for awhile, which is likely since it is rarely produced, you've already spent many times more money on heating and cooling costs than your windows are worth. The benefits of double or triple glazing will last decades, saving you money every single month on bills.

Energy loss with single glazing


Throwing Money Out the Window

With single glazed windows, the above saying is nearly literal. Double glazed windows dramatically improve thermal insulation, and energy efficiency while reducing heat loss, condensation and outside noise.

If you want to lower heating bills, convert to double or triple glazing

With that list of features, it not no exaggeration to say that single glazed windows are out of date and equivalent to the gas-guzzling cars of previous decades.

Modern windows use multiple panes of glass, separated by a cavity of air or noble gas such as argon and krypton to reduce conductivity and prevent heat transfer between the interior and exterior of your home.

Single-glazed fanlights

Double glazing can reduce heat loss by over half compared to single reducing the impact on both your wallet, and the environment. Additionally, they provide more security than single panes which are quickly and easily broken by burglars.


Limited Use Today

Despite being completely unsuitable for modern windows and doors, there are a few continued uses single glazing where the disadvantages are irrelevant. Popular uses today include:

  • Picture glass
  • Furniture
  • Interior separating glass
  • Greenhouses
  • Decorative purposes

In combination with wood, there are a number of ways in which single sheet glazing can be put to good use. Single glazed interior elements such as doors in bedrooms and living rooms or transom windows inside the home do not require the same properties as exterior facing windows.

Single-glazed window with glazing bars

Regardless of where you live, it is wise to consult your local building codes before considering the use of single glazing in a new home. Many countries no longer allow it or at least severely limit its use.

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